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As If You Don't Have Enough To Worry About! How To Avoid Identity Theft

Whether they're snatching your purse, diving into your dumpster, stealing your mail, or hacking into your computer, they're out to get you. Who are they? Identity thieves. Identity thieves can empty your bank account, max out your credit cards, open new accounts in your name, and purchase furniture, cars, and even homes on the basis of your credit history. If they give your personal information to the police during an arrest and then don't show up for a court date, you may be subsequently arrested and jailed. And what will you get for their efforts? You'll get the headache and expense of cleaning up the mess they leave behind. You may never be able to completely prevent your identity from being stolen, but here are some steps you can take to help protect yourself from becoming a victim. Check yourself out It's important to review your credit report periodically. Check to make sure that all the information contained in it is correct, and be on the lookout for any fraudulent activity. You may get your credit report for free once a year. To do so, contact the Annual Credit Report Request Service online at www.annualcreditreport.com or call (877) 322-8228. If you need to correct any information or dispute any entries, contact the three national credit reporting agencies: Equifax: www.equifax.com (800) 685-1111 Experian: www.experian.com (888) 397-3742 TransUnion: www.transunion.com (800) 916-8800 Secure your number Your most important personal identifier is your Social Security number (SSN). Guard it carefully. Never carry your Social Security card with you unless you'll need it. The same goes for other forms of identification (for example, health insurance cards) that display your SSN. If your state uses your SSN as your driver's license number, request an alternate number. Don't have your SSN preprinted on your checks, and don't let merchants write it on your checks. Don't give it out over the phone unless you initiate the call to an organization you trust. Ask the three major credit reporting agencies to truncate it on your credit reports. Try to avoid listing it on employment applications; offer instead to provide it during a job interview.
 By, John Brenkovich,Registered CFP,Registered ChFC,Registered AAMS

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